The Week of June 14th 2021, will go down in history in Illinois because of six "apocalyptic" weather happenings, all in a weeks time.

Apocalyptic - describing or prophesying the complete destruction of the world.

Weather for the week of June 14th 2021 in Illinois included:

  • Tornadoes
  • Large Hail
  • Heatwave
  • Flooding
  • Earthquake
  • Drought

So we get through a year plus of a world wide pandemic, and now I guess Mother Nature is all, "whoa, slow down with all your return to normal stuff people...it's my turn to freak you out!"

I found a very interested Facebook page called "Illinois Storm Community," made up of storm chasers (you people are nuts) total weather geeks, meteorologists, and simple way, way too smart people that know more about weather than me. People share incredible storm photos and "results of a storm" photos that are simply breathtaking. Some of the cloud photos on this fan page are so good you will think they are paintings.

The post that grabbed my attention was all about the wide array of weather happenings in one Illinois week. Can you remember the last time something like this happened? The only thing that was missing, was a drastic drop in temperature and a few snow flakes. Seriuously, the week of June 14th was like some sort of James Cameron movie!

There was said to be a Moses sighting as well, but I chalk that up to that's simply how 20 somethings look these days with the beards and terrible clothes.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

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