More than a few fans shed tears when Anthony Rizzo was traded to the Yankees this week, and it's not just about how he played on the field. 

Let me start this by telling you I haven't been able to watch any of the videos circling online this morning about Rizzo leaving the Cubs. Maybe by the time I finish writing this I will but I seriously am afraid I'll start crying at my desk.

I have been a Cubs fan since before I was born.


We had this GIANT Mark Grace poster that was literally on the ceiling of my basement when you walked down the stairs, I think it was a 'Got Milk,' ad that my oldest brother had to have. Somehow I ended up with Corey Patterson as my favorite player a few decades ago, but no matter how good these players were on the field or in interview or baseball card signings, they weren't Anthony Rizzo. What made the difference? Social Media. With Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and just having full access to the Internet at any times on our phones, superstars like Rizzo seem like so much more than baseball players.

We aren't just watching the games anymore, we are hanging out with Rizzo's dog Kevin on Instagram every day.

We felt like we were at his wedding to Emily, and that we're with him every time he makes a visit to Lurie's Children's Hospital.

Of course Rizzo is a stand out on the field, and his personality would've made him a beloved Cubbie without a social media presence, but it wouldn't be as hard to say good-bye.

Oh and about that World Series the Cubs brought home with Rizzo leading the way. That was pretty good too.

I also write this as an aunt to six Cubs fans, one who's about to become a Yankees fan because his Rizzo love is too big to hide. I think Anderson's first word might've been Rizzo, or maybe like his fourth word.


I think Maddon will be ok, though.

Fine. I watched the video. I cried. 

 

 

 

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