Cyberattack is one of those words that we hear so often and it means so many different things, but it's nearly always costly for someone who find themselves on the receiving end of one.

BusinessInsider.com has a pretty good definition of a cyberattack:

The intent of the attack can vary — some attacks are intended to disable the computer system while others intend to gain control over it. Still others intend to infiltrate the system to steal or destroy data. While cyberattacks are often aimed at organizations, individuals are not immune from cyberattack either.

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New Study Shows Cyber Crime Has Gone Up 800% In The Last Ten Years

Even with increased scrutiny, training, vigilance, and protective software, the numbers of groups, businesses, organizations, and individuals who are getting successfully attacked keeps going up.

According to a new study by CCTVCameraWorld.com, using cybercrime incidents reported to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, the total cost of cybercrime incidents reported to the FBI has gone up by nearly 800 percent since 2011. The low was about 263,000 in 2013 which then jumped to almost 800,000 in 2020. Cyberattacks cost the U.S. about 4 billion last year alone.

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Illinois Victims Lost The 12th Most Money In The U.S.

CCTVCameraWorld.com's study has a breakdown of the average money loss for individuals state-by-state, and one state stands out above all the others in this category. Individual victims in North Dakota lost, on average, $33,954. The next closest state is our neighbor Missouri where the average loss was $14,205. Rounding out the top 5 are Ohio ($12,680), New York ($12,051), and Utah ($9,564).

Illinois victims' individual losses averaged out at $7,456. Wisconsin victims were out $4,343.

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