Your kids are now free to get that lemonade stand they've been dreaming of set up and running, thanks to the efforts of Hayli Martenez, a young girl whose lemonade stand was shut down by Kankakee area officials.

Okay, maybe the kids will have to wait for next summer, as SB119, or "Hayli's Law" takes effect on January 1st, 2022. Governor Pritzker signed the bill into law last Friday, after rapid approval through the Statehouse.

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Here's the wording of SB119/Hayli's Law (ILga.gov):

Provides that the amendatory Act may be referred to as Hayli's Law. Amends the Food Handling Regulation Enforcement Act. Provides that, notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Department of Public Health, the health department of a unit of local government, or a public health district may not regulate the sale of lemonade or nonalcoholic drinks or mixed beverages by a person under the age of 16. Effective January 1, 2022.

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This whole thing got started back in 2017, when Hayli Martenez decided to open up a lemonade stand with the help of her mom. According to a report at IllinoisPolicy.org,  "Hayli Martenez started her Haylibug Lemonade stand to raise money for her college fund. In a violent neighborhood where people are reluctant to go out, Hayli brought together her Kankakee, Illinois, neighbors as she happily sold 50-cent cups of lemonade."

Well, she did until Kankakee local officials paid her a visit. Then they shut her down, telling her she was looking at being fined for her transgression. There was something about lack of sewer and water at her location, although Hayli and her mom Iva pointed out that they were using bottled water to make the lemonade.

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Fast forward to the present, and after efforts by Illinois State Senator Patrick Joyce, Hayli and other Illinois kids (as long as they're under age 16) can get back to work selling lemonade in front of their houses while adding to their college funds.

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