You know the saying, "You can't judge a book by its cover?" Apparently that doesn't apply to watermelons.

No summer cookout is complete without a big ol' juicy watermelon for everyone to enjoy once they've finished inhaling hamburgers, hot dogs, and potato salad. Even though summer cookouts with friends and family may look a little different this summer (if they happen at all), watermelon is still tasty snack to enjoy any time the mood strikes. But how do you know which one to buy? There are big ones, there are little ones, some are round like a baseball, some are oval like a football. Most are green with black and white striping, but the shade of green may different. Does any of that even matter? They all taste the same, right? Not necessarily.

Apparently, the size, shape, and even coloring of the melon can tell you what you can expect the inside to taste like based on this infographic from Eagle Eye Produce and shared on the Family Farmer's of America Facebook page.

As you can imagine, people had thoughts they weren't afraid to share in the comments section after the graphic was posted. A lady by the name of Betty Sequin asked,

...Do we deduce that all round watermelons taste better than oval ones? And I thought sweetness depended on both temperature when the melon was ripening, and ripeness when picked, not just webbing?

Angela Sumpter threw size, shape, and color totally out the window and said that she had always heard you could tell how sweet they were based on the sound they make when you tap them, claiming "if they sound more hollow than they're sweeter."

Meanwhile, a Facebook user by the name of El Cazador seemed to agree and said,

All valid but look at stem end. A torn piece of stem means it was picked unripe. A cleanly released stem scar with brown sticky oxidized sugar stain means it was ripe when picked.

I guess the best way you can determine the accuracy of what the graphic claims will be through trail and error. Keep this article handy on your phone, then pull it up on your phone next time you're shopping for melons to test one of the theories for yourself.

[Source: Family Farmer's of America on Facebook]

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