It was only a week ago Wednesday that we Northern Illinois residents were flung headlong into the deep-freeze, with area temperatures dipping as low as -23 in places like Rochelle, while Rockford hit -19.

Fast forward a week, and the Rockford area has dodged a huge snowstorm that dumped some serious amounts of snow all over a good chunk of our state.

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It Was Pretty Amazing To See How Many Illinoisans Got Buried Under Multiple Inches Of Snow While Rockford And The Rockford Area Went Untouched

Here's the thing, all that snow in Chicago and other areas near Lake Michigan isn't done yet. They're still getting hit with lake effect snow combined with the ongoing snow-front at 10:00 on a Thursday morning. Places that got nearly a foot of snow on Wednesday could be looking at 4-6 more inches being tacked onto their totals.

Central Illinois is still getting a good pounding from snow today, too.

Two snow plows work together to clear a multi-lane highway.
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Taking A Look At Total Snowfall Amounts, Northern Indiana Got It Worst, But Not By That Much

The snowfall totals aren't going to do anything but go up today, especially in areas around the lake, but here's some snowfall numbers from Wednesday, compiled by the National Weather Service (NWS):

  • South Haven, Indiana: 13.5 inches
  • Cedar Lake, Indiana: 12.5 inches
  • Frankfort, Illinois: 11.5 inches
  • Gardner, Illinois, 11.3 inches
  • Dyer, Indiana: 11.2 inches
  • Oak Lawn, Illinois, 11.0 inches
  • Midway Airport: 11.0 inches
  • Joliet, Illinois: 10.8 inches
  • Kankakee, Illinois: 9.0 inches
  • Chicago Lakefront: 8.2 inches
  • O'Hare Airport: 5.6 inches

As for Rockford and the Rockford Area:

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Illinois Residents Will Use Anything and Everything to Claim DIBS on a Parking Spot

There aren't rules for the items Illinoisans will use to call dibs on a parking spot they shoveled and salted after a big snow system has passed over.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.