A new bill was submitted to the House of Representatives in Springfield, Illinois this morning. It is certainly an interesting topic of conversation. You may even hear about it at your favorite watering hole.

The bill is named the "Shot and a Beer" bill, according to MyStateline.com. You can't even make that up.

Straight To The Point

Per the proposal, the establishment would have to host a publicly advertised promotion as a method of encouraging residents to get the COVID-19 vaccination. Customers who are able to provide proof of receiving the vaccine would then be eligible for one alcoholic drink or shot.

If passed, the bill would amend the Liquor Control Act of 1934, says MyStateline.com.

 

This is interesting because, in the state of Illinois, giving away free booze has always been a big promotional no-no. But, this begs the question, is free alcohol enough to convince those who say they will not get a COVID-19 vaccination? And, is there anything else that can be tossed their way to convince them a little more?

I'm three weeks out from being fully vaccinated. I did it for a few reasons, none of which were directly related to freebies.

  1. I trust science.
  2. My 73-year-old mother was concerned based on inaccurate information from her neighbors and asked if I'd get it with her.
  3. I desperately want normalcy; concerts, events, gatherings, and jump ahead of what I could feel like should I contract COVID-19.

Other Vaccination Incentives

Could other incentives help the undecided or "it's a 'no' for me" crowd? What about free pizzas, tacos, tattoos, or tickets to events?

Whatever way the vaccine naysayers might respond to the above question isn't important to me. And, as I've stated repeatedly, I will not judge or look down on anyone who does not want to get vaccinated- it is their choice. I do openly encourage everyone to get the shot(s) because... science.

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JB Love is ½ of  Q98.5's Lil Zim & JB In The Morning, weekday mornings from 5:00 a.m. to 10 a.m. Follow him on Twitter, Instagram.

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[h/t MyStateline]