Down in Springfield, Illinois Senate Bill 3854 (SB3854), if passed into law, would ban the sale of all flavored tobacco products, including cigarettes, e-cigarettes and chewing tobacco. For the moment, that bill is still "in committee."

Back on January 1st of this year, The Preventing Youth Vaping Act went into effect, which prohibits companies from directing advertisements and marketing materials at people younger than 21 by including cartoons and images from video games.

Getty Images
Getty Images
loading...
Young man smoking an electronic cigarette. Black background.
Getty Images
loading...
No electronic cigarettes sign.
Getty Images
loading...

Illinois State Senator Julie Morrison (D-Lake Forest), introduced Senate Bill 3854 because she believes that flavored vapes, cigarettes, and even chewing tobaccos are intentionally targeted to children by the use of candy-like names in their marketing

State Senator Morrison's thoughts are backed up by several studies, including one from the American Lung Association's "State of Tobacco Control" report. That report says that almost 1 in 4 high school students have used, or are using tobacco products, including flavored vapes and flavored tobacco.

Preteen girl tries e-cigarette under the influence of her friend.
Getty Images
loading...
Getty Images
Getty Images
loading...
Shot of a young woman vaping at home
Getty Images
loading...

A Consumer Advocacy Group Thinks That Illinois Banning These Flavored Products May Backfire In The Long Run

According to a recent piece at Patch.com, Elizabeth Hicks, U.S. Affairs analyst with the Consumer Choice Center, said that putting a ban on flavors in place may very well shove adult smokers right back to tobacco, even when cigarette smoking is on the overall decline.

"About 12% of adults in 2020 reported smoking, however, if this bill passes, we can certainly expect that number to increase. With more people smoking cigarettes, taxpayers will eventually have to pick up the tab. This ultimately will lead to increases in smoking-related healthcare costs, which are already costing Illinois taxpayers over $1.9 billion annually," Hicks said.

10 Illinois Stereotypes People Say Are Accurate But We Think Are Questionable

KEEP READING: Scroll to see what the big headlines were the year you were born